DEUS EX: MANKIND DIVIDED

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is one of the best games I have played this year. At its worst, it feels like it is pulling in two directions. Although the narrative and gameplay have not reached the level of full-scale war, there is certainly a bit of hostility.

Most of the time you will forgive its drawbacks. The world of Mankind Divided is full of interactions between individuals and objects. Every five minutes, there is an email to read, a door to cut, someone to investigate, and a store to grab. Wandering in the game world, you can always find another alley to run, or the computer to hack.

Although there is only one hub this time, the anti-aug city of Prague. In the game, as the situation in the city deteriorates, you will revisit it many times. When the game starts and ends, you will have a sense of belonging to the city and everything that exists in it. But this is currently the most impressive hub in Deus Ex games.

This is also one of the reasons for the earliest moments of disharmony in Mankind Divided. You play Adam Jensen again, returning from the previous work “Human Revolution”. Jensen has more agency this time, but people still want you to do a bunch of things. They want you to solve it quickly: go to rescue your friends from the thugs, fix your augs, and investigate an explosion.

In fact, Jensen has so much agency power that the central allegory of the game is to compare those with reinforcements to the victims of modern racism. The police will ask you to make up slurs while checking your documents. No matter how many lives you save, the people at work will be very polite to you, but knowing that Jensen can easily kill them all, it means no risk.

Jensen doesn’t care about the police checking his documents and threatening them thinly, and the players don’t care because they all know how easy it is to turn the guard upside down. This means that the central theme of the plot dies in pursuit of giving Jensen more agency power, allowing players to live out their power fantasy.

When you enter its battle, Mankind Divided is a very interesting game. There are many enhancements (combat capabilities) to choose from in the game, from jumping high or piercing walls, to stun guns or functional teleports on your wrist, allowing you to hit others with the blade of your elbow neck.

Here is a resource management tip, because some of the more powerful augs will “overclock” your system, causing them to become prone to problems. Effective power management can guarantee your safety, but since this system is limited to stronger forces, I find myself avoiding them to ensure that nothing is short-circuited at the wrong moment.

The fight is still not as tight as the latest and greatest FPS options, but it feels correct. There are so many options. After running out of ammunition in a battle, I hid in a vent and ran to safety. I was caught empty in another battle, so I used the refrigerator as a projectile weapon. Adam Jensen is not an unstoppable killing machine, underestimating your opponent will hurt you, but he is superman, so you can do wonderful things to overcome any obstacles.

This time, due to the addition of EMP ammunition, the weapon has been used more. Even stealth players will disable cameras, robots and other electrical equipment for a few seconds. The weapon itself is still quite formal, but the game now has Far Cry ability, which can change the ammunition type and accessories during flight.

The key is not to use “Deus Ex” as a shooting game because it doesn’t play like that game. If you expect it, you will leave in disappointment. Fighting is more like a series of puzzles, usually starting when you slide into a bunker and decide how to win. You always have a lot of choices, whether it is to stealth and hit a lot of people, or turn the turret to your side, or release your hands and feet and throw a lot of grenades at the enemies.

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